5 Nutrients To Combat Hair Loss In Winter

The dropping temperatures, snug pull-overs, and warm lattes; winter brings a sense of happiness to most. However, for those with thinning hair, this season may bring the exact opposite emotion. While it is normal for you to lose hair in winter [1], an excessive amount of this can be quite disheartening. Don’t pull out your hair in worry just yet, we tell you ways to fix this with amazing nutrients and foods. 

  1. Iron: Iron controls the hemoglobin in your body, which is used to transport oxygen in the blood and to your organs [2]. If you are low on iron, your body finds it tough to get enough oxygen, especially to your hair and nails, causing hair loss. Have iron-rich foods or supplements to strengthen your hair. 

Foods Rich in Iron: Green vegetables, mangoes, lentils and beans, nuts and seeds.

  1. Selenium: Your body has enzymes that are responsible for killing the harmful free radicals that affect your skin and hair cells, causing hair fall and premature aging. Selenium helps them be more reactive, which means fight better. It even helps balance the thyroid function and boosts antioxidants, both of which help in better hair strength.[3] More importantly, it is used to treat dandruff, a common side effect in the dry winter air.

Foods Rich In Selenium: Brazil nuts, wheat germ, whole grains, oats, brown rice, fish, seafood, and lean meats.

  1. Zinc: Zinc influences your hair follicle’s protein structure. In addition, it acts as a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor (5-ARI) that manages hormone-related hair loss. [4] In fact, most hair supplements have zinc to stop and even reverse the early stages of balding.

Foods Rich In Zinc: Meat, seafood and fish, legumes and beans, dairy, eggs, and whole grains

  1. Protein: Proteins are the building blocks of life, and amino acids are building blocks of protein. They help breakdown foods, move nutrients to the bloodstream, and regulate hormones and appetite, so they’re a vital part of your body. Your hair cells are full of amino acids, but the harsh weather can reduce and damage these nutrients, hence you need to replenish them with your diet. Not only do they stop hair fall, but they also aid in creating healthy and shiny hair.

Foods Rich In Protein: Meat, fish, dairy products, pulses, soy

  1. Biotin: This is a water-soluble vitamin B [6] that helps process certain nutrients like amino acids and minerals, and convert them into useful energy for the body. It helps revitalize your hair and keep them strong.

Foods Rich In Biotin: Egg yolk, roasted almonds, cauliflower, mushrooms, sweet potato and spinach

Along with a healthy diet of the above items, ensure that you care for your hair with organic shampoos and oils.

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2003996
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3678013/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4828511/
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6380979/
  5. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20041-9
  6. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/drp/2015/841570/

Grandmother Knows Best: 6 Scientifically-Backed Remedies to Survive Winter

Temperatures in India are on a steady decline and winter has set in with cardigans, mufflers, sweaters, and monkey caps around. Unfortunately, this is also the time when most of us get a common cold, cough, flu, and have joint pains. Interestingly, in this season most of our grandmothers charge into the kitchen and prepare natural remedies in a secretive sort-of manner. While we may have avoided these kitchen-remedies our whole lives, we may need to pay heed to them now, as even science says that our grandmas were right. 

Desi foods by grandmothers provide wonderful concoctions of nutrients and immunity, which are beneficial for the entire body, so we tell you the best home remedies for surviving winter.

  1. Cold and Cough: Sniffles, sneezes, fever, and body aches, the common cold can be quite a downer during the party season.

Grandma’s Remedy: Heard about the magic potion called ‘kaadha’? It is made with two power ingredients pepper and turmeric. The latter is known to increase mucous secretion, which helps flush out the harmful bacteria. Plus, its antibacterial properties help fight the infection. Pepper is also antibacterial and contains vitamin C for boosting immunity. 

  1. Immunity Issues: Has it happened to you that despite wearing all possible layers of warm clothes, you still manage to catch the flu? This indicates a problem of low immunity. 

Grandma’s Remedy: To strengthen your immunity, consume a combination of ginger juice [2], basil (tulsi) leaves, and a teaspoon of honey. Ginger has anti-inflammatory benefits and is anti-bacterial to help the immune system fight better. Basil leaves increase natural antibodies and T helper cells in the blood, thereby increasing immunity. Similarly, honey also has antibacterial properties that help strengthen your body from the inside [3]. 

  1. Chest Congestion: A common winter complaint is that of wheezing, sore throat, and sleep difficulties due to congestion of mucus in the chest.

Grandma’s Remedy: Heat cow’s ghee in a pan and add a few garlic cloves to the same. Massaging this gently on your chest will help you fight chest congestion. The usage of cow’s ghee is part of Ayurvedic treatment for relieving cold-like symptoms, while the intense aroma and antioxidants in cloves provide relief from chest congestion. [6]    

  1. Joint Pain: If your morning has started with muscle cramps, backache or knee pain, try this before you pop that pain killer.

Grandma’s Remedy: Have a spoonful of turmeric with ghee or turmeric milk. Curcumin in turmeric has anti-inflammatory properties that ease the pain, reduce swelling and ensure smooth functioning of joints. Additionally, the fat in milk or ghee helps make turmeric more effective when consumed.

  1. Digestive Problems: Suffering from constipation or indigestion due to party season binge? Do not be in a hurry to gulp down tea or coffee early in the morning. 

Grandma’s Remedy: Have warm water with lemon juice, which would work to clean the digestive tract and also eliminate fat. Lemon flushes out the toxins floating around your GI tract and also relieves the symptoms of indigestion. [8]

  1. Dry Skin: The dry weather tends to absorb the hydration and moisture of the skin, leaving it dry and dull. If you don’t take care, you might also see a few signs of aging in the form of wrinkles.

Grandma’s Remedy: The problem of skin dryness can be solved by using curd. It is rich in lactic acid, which is an alpha hydroxy acid that dissolves dead skin cells and helps replenish new ones. [9]

References:

  1. http://www.ijddr.in/drug-development/cold-and-flu-conventional-vs-botanical–nutritional-therapy.pdf
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665023/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5424551/
  4. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0656/a638abdfa284b83455b83d11f953d648dad5.pdf
  5. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5553043_Polyphenols_and_Antioxidant_Properties_of_Almond_Skins_Influence_of_Industrial_Processing
  6. http://www.imedpub.com/articles/the-versatility-of-cow-ghee-an-ayurvedaperspective.pdf
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27213821
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4223119/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22152494

How I eat 2 rasgullas daily & stay fit? A guide to eating Indian Mithai guilt-free

Surely, you’ve read our recent post on how to eat fried foods without guilt. In this post, we’ll teach you how to befriend another of your favourite dishes that have been labelled as a villain by most nutritionists – sweets, our good ol’ desi mithai.

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Rasgullas, who doesn’t love them? These fluffy, white instantly-melt-in-your-mouth balls of sweetness! No wonder I can never stop at one rasgulla! And even if I dig into two rasgullas for the next 15 days, I will still not gain a kilo! My genetics or metabolism is not responsible for it. But, my eating habits are. My trick is – I relish sweets with a smile and smartness.

After reading this blog, I am confident that you’ll master this trick too! So, let’s get started!

Craving for halwa in the sweater weather? Go ahead and dig into it!

Seasonal mithais are a good idea. Similar to how aamras soothes your body in the sweltering summers, ghee and nut-based mithais in the winters keep your skin soft and supple. According to our ancient scriptures, there are cooling foods and warming foods. During winters, you need to eat foods that warm your body internally and keep the metabolic rate high. Fats keep you warm and also give you more energy. That’s why, this winter, reap the benefits of healthy fats through peanuts, nuts, sesame seeds and ghee. Dig into peanut chikki, gajak, carrot halwa and an assortment of laddoos – including besan ka laddo, gound ka laddoo, til laddoo and pinni – without any guilt!

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And you know what? Seasonal ingredients change the way mithais are prepared. Last week, I prepared gajar ka halwa at home. I took a small portion of it to my father for tasting. After he finished the bowl, he told me that it tasted great but was a little less sweet. That’s when I told him that I haven’t even added any sugar yet. The sweetness came from the all-natural seasonal carrots. Later, I ended up making the gajar halwa with almost 1/3rd the sugar of a traditional recipe. You see, that’s the power of using seasonal fruits and veggies in Indian mithais.

Here’s an interesting fact: Your maa ke “aate ka ladoo” with milk and a handful of nuts is one of the most traditional and nutritious Indian breakfast. This meal can give any breakfast cereal a run for their money.

Let’s say, you’re not into seasonal sweets and prefer grabbing a gulab jamun, rasmalai or a kalakand.

Our advice: savour it as a post-workout meal. Since our bodies require instant energy after a gruelling exercise session, the sugar in the mithai will be used for energy instead of getting converted into fat.

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Whoa! That’s an amazing reward for working out, isn’t it?

Alternatively, you can relish a small gulab jamun as a mid-morning snack along with five-six nuts to keep the sugar levels in check.

Some tips to keep in mind while preparing or eating mithais:

  • As with fried food, our best advice is to prepare sweets at home, instead of buying it at a nearby mithai shop.
  • Your preferred ingredient for sweetness should be jaggery over white sugar since it’s more nutritious. You can opt for dried dates or figs to up the healthy quotient of your mithai. But one thing you must avoid at all costs is artificial sweeteners. They are loaded with chemicals which create havoc with our health, ranging from bone loss to hair loss.
  • Adding condiments and spices like cardamom and nutmeg to your mithais boost the metabolic rate. A high metabolic rate lowers fat conversion.
  • The thumb rule to avoid weight gain with sweets is to eat sweets as a snack i.e. an hour or two after breakfast or lunch and not with it. That way, you’ll satisfy your taste buds and not dread the weighing scale.

Now, we are sure, a smart eater like you would look beyond the calories and get back the nuts, whole grains and ghee in the mithai. After all, these super-healthy ingredients brim with the goodness of protein, fat, and fibre. All these nutrients keep your stomach full for longer as well as slow down the digestion of sugar. As a result, you keep overeating at bay as well as lower the risk of sugar getting converted into fat. Now, that’s similar to eating two mithais for the calories of one!

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Sweets can be a delicious affair if you learn how to eat them the right way. And with our tips, you can give in to your sweet tooth and still lose weight.’

It’s time you became best friends with the much ‘maligned’ mithai!

bon happetee - diet download, diet plan app, best diet app, lose weight without workoutVishruta is a nutritionist by profession and a writer by heart. Content writing and menu planning have become her passions over the past few years. Love food, love life — is her mantra.